Argyll Fisheries Trust

MISSION STATEMENT
"To promote and improve the health of aquatic ecosystems and self sustaining fish populations. To understand the biology and ecology of all freshwater fish species, including those that migrate between fresh and marine waters, their environment and factors that affect them."

01499 302322
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Latest Projects »

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Argyll Fisheries Trust Projects

Rivers in Argyll »

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Rivers in Argyll

Argyll Fisheries Trust
Cherry Park
Inveraray, Argyll
PA32 8XE

01499 302322
Email Us

Projects

These are the main projects we are currently working on.  Reports from many of our projects can be found in the ‘Publications’ page.

Pearls in Peril (PIP²) – A Project that improved habitat for fish that will also benefit Freshwater Pearl Mussels on a River of Special Area of conservation (SAC).

River Goil Habitat (on-going) – Fish and habitat surveys of the River Goil found that instream fish habitat is impacted by fine sediment which reduce egg and young fish survival. AFT has worked with the Lochgoilhead Community Trust, local farmers, Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park and Forestry and Land Scotland to reduce erosion and increase vegetation cover on sensitive riverbanks.

River Ruel Habitat (on-going) – Similar to the R. Goil and other rivers on the Cowal Peninsular Fish and habitat surveys of the River Ruel found that instream fish habitat is impacted by fine sediment which reduce egg and young fish survival. AFT has worked with the River Ruel Improvement Association, local farmers, Wind Farm Trust and Scottish & Southern Energy to reduce erosion and increase vegetation cover on sensitive riverbanks.

Kinglas Water Habitat (2012) and River Etive (2019) – in partnership with local Estates, AFT has helped to re-establish riparian trees that will improve cover for fish and mitigate the effects of climate change by shading the river channel. AFT worked on the River Creran (2015) with Forestry and Land Scotland to restore fish habitat in previously canalised tributary streams.

In partnership with MSS, AFT have managed a network of in-river Data Storage Tags (DST) that collect continuous water temperature data in the Add and Carradale catchments that inform a national initiative to better understand the threat of climate change on salmonid fish through the Scotland River Temperature Monitoring Network (SRTMN)³. In 2018 (on-going), AFT installed a network of DST’s in the River Awe catchment to assess the effect of local land use on stream temperatures.

¹NEPS - https://www2.gov.scot/Topics/marine/Salmon-Trout-Coarse/Freshwater/Monitoring/ElectrofishingProgramme

²PIP - https://www.nature.scot/professional-advice/safeguarding-protected-areas-and-species/protected-species/life-nature-and-biodiversity-projects/pearls-peril

³SRTMN - http://marine.gov.scot/information/scotland-river-temperature-monitoring-network-srtmn-predictions-river-temperature-and

Other Projects have focused on specific issues affecting migratory salmonids in the marine environment on the west coast of Scotland including the Tripartite Working Group (TWG), the Marine Interactions with Aquaculture Project (MIAP) and monitoring of sea lice burdens of sea trout funded by MSS.

The Trust has undertaken a range of local fisheries and national projects. Local fishery projects have funded baseline fish population and fish habitat surveys on most of the rivers in Argyll & the Islands (see RIVERS section) with the help of local fisheries and several funding partners including Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH). In 2018 and 2019 AFT surveyed 30 sites around Argyll & the Isles which were randomly selected by Marine Scotland Science (MSS). These surveys are part of the wider National Electrofishing Programme of Scotland (NEPS)¹. The results of these surveys are being used to inform Conservation Limits for Atlantic Salmon in the region.